Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
transcriptions:rules [2019-12-18 22:35:37]
Ken Norman changed font of long s character; other minor wordsmithing
transcriptions:rules [2019-12-26 10:41:02] (current)
Ken Norman reworked the examples
Line 3: Line 3:
   * **Semantic preservation**:​ I always preserve the [[define>​semantics]] of what is written/​typed. If the text is factually incorrect, I nevertheless remain faithful to the author'​s words.   * **Semantic preservation**:​ I always preserve the [[define>​semantics]] of what is written/​typed. If the text is factually incorrect, I nevertheless remain faithful to the author'​s words.
   * **Brackets**:​ I use brackets (i.e., ''<​typo fc:blue; fw:​bold>​[</​typo>​ %%...%% <typo fc:blue; fw:​bold>​]</​typo>''​) to denote something that is //not// in the original text. I have very rarely found brackets in use in older handwritten text.   * **Brackets**:​ I use brackets (i.e., ''<​typo fc:blue; fw:​bold>​[</​typo>​ %%...%% <typo fc:blue; fw:​bold>​]</​typo>''​) to denote something that is //not// in the original text. I have very rarely found brackets in use in older handwritten text.
-    * **Errors**: I use ''​[sic]''​ to denote when an error is the author'​s,​ not mine. Sometimes, I will include the correction when it isn't entirely obvious (e.g., ''​pson [sic: person]''​). +    * **Errors**: I use ''​[sic]''​ to denote when an error is the author'​s,​ not mine. Sometimes, I will include the correction when it isn't entirely obvious (e.g., ​pson ''​[sic:​ person]''​). 
-    * **Dates**: Dates are written in a variety of ways, to include numbers written as words. I strive to always type the date in a standardized Gregorian Calendar format of ''​dd Mmm yyyy''​ immediately after the text date (e.g., ​''​the Tenth Day of aprill 1684 [10 Apr 1684]''​). This makes the date more easily recognized by search engines. +    * **Dates**: Dates are written in a variety of ways, to include numbers written as words. I strive to always type the date in a standardized Gregorian Calendar format of ''​dd Mmm yyyy''​ immediately after the text date (e.g., the Tenth Day of aprill 1684 ''​[10 Apr 1684]''​). This makes the date more easily recognized by search engines. 
-    * **Numbers**:​ When quantities are written as words, I'll give the numeric equivalent in brackets (e.g., ​''​one hundred [100]''​). +    * **Numbers**:​ When quantities are written as words, I'll give the numeric equivalent in brackets (e.g., one hundred ​''​[100]''​). 
-    * **Names**: When a name is abbreviated,​ or given only as initials, I will provide a complete name if it is known (e.g., ​''​Wm. [William]''​). This helps improve search engine results.+    * **Names**: When a name is abbreviated,​ or given only as initials, I will provide a complete name if it is known (e.g., Wm. ''​[William]''​). This helps improve search engine results.
     * **Illegible/​Confusing**: ​     * **Illegible/​Confusing**: ​
       * If a word is illegible, I'll typically use a sequence of underline characters in place of the unknown word (e.g., ''​[%%____%%]''​). ​       * If a word is illegible, I'll typically use a sequence of underline characters in place of the unknown word (e.g., ''​[%%____%%]''​). ​
       * Sometimes I'll take a reasonable guess (based on context and/or similarity to other text on the page) and include a question mark (e.g., ''​[twenty?​]''​). ​       * Sometimes I'll take a reasonable guess (based on context and/or similarity to other text on the page) and include a question mark (e.g., ''​[twenty?​]''​). ​
       * Occasionally,​ if the word appears legible, but also seems incorrect in context, I'll just add a commented question mark after the transcription (e.g., "​...Quingsby''​[?​]''​ Swamp..."​).       * Occasionally,​ if the word appears legible, but also seems incorrect in context, I'll just add a commented question mark after the transcription (e.g., "​...Quingsby''​[?​]''​ Swamp..."​).
-    * **Money**: I will indicate money using modern notation wherever possible (e.g., ​''​ten pounds [£10]''​). If old style notation is used, I will convert to modern notation (e.g., ''​4/​ [4s]''​, which is four shillings).+    * **Money**: I will indicate money using modern notation wherever possible (e.g., ten pounds ​''​[£10]''​). If old style notation is used, I will convert to modern notation (e.g., ​4/ ''​[4 shillings]'';​ or, 4/ ''​[4s]''​).
   * **No new content**: I never introduce new content into the transcribed text (except when contained within brackets, as described above).   * **No new content**: I never introduce new content into the transcribed text (except when contained within brackets, as described above).
   * **"​Long"​ //s//**: The [[wp>​Long_s|long s]] (i.e., the <typo fc:blue; fw:bold; ff:​serif>//​ſ//</​typo>​ character) is an archaic form of the lower case letter //s//, which was used both in some early printing typesets as well as in handwriting. I simply replace it with a lowercase //s//. Some transcribers use the lowercase //f//, but that is grammatically and syntactically incorrect.   * **"​Long"​ //s//**: The [[wp>​Long_s|long s]] (i.e., the <typo fc:blue; fw:bold; ff:​serif>//​ſ//</​typo>​ character) is an archaic form of the lower case letter //s//, which was used both in some early printing typesets as well as in handwriting. I simply replace it with a lowercase //s//. Some transcribers use the lowercase //f//, but that is grammatically and syntactically incorrect.
  • Last modified: 2019-12-26 10:41:02
  • by Ken Norman